History

Course Contacts

Head of Department: 

P. Koller  ( kollerp@turton.uk.com )

Teaching Staff: 

E. Lane  ( lanee@turton.uk.com )

K. Bali  ( balik@turton.uk.com )

S. Tither  ( tithers@turton.uk.com )

T. Cordwell  ( cordwellt@turton.uk.com )

Department News

Revision Materials

At the forefront of our approach to the History curriculum are the three elements of Trivium 21c; which we have reworded as "What I need to know", "How I can improve my understanding" and "How I can communicate what I know". Focusing on these three aspects as a 7 year progression has meant that we spend more time developing the fundamental building blocks of our curriculum. Ensuring that students have a firm grasp of the history content is our primary focus, before we expect them to process information and then apply higher order skills. An example of this change can be seen at KS4 where students are perfecting their ability to describe historical events before moving on to the more challenging skills of explaining significance and comparative analysis.

Our emphasis on progression from age 11-18 means that we have identified the key aspects of being a master historian at different age ranges and measure the students against this. We then model the criteria to students by emphasising what a good historian can do and what an excellent historian can do. Our transition to a level free KS3 has also meant that we dedicate more time to enhancing historical skills over a more extended period; an example here can be seen in Year 9 where students have worked on a variety of aspects of World War One, before considering the overall extent of British success.

 

At KS5 we continue to work on preparing students for higher education; we have built in additional independent learning opportunities by encouraging students to develop their contextual understanding through additional reading. We also use a seminar style approach to some lessons which means that students are taking increased responsibility for their work. Our personal study on US Civil Rights aims to reflect the nature of university style extended essays and dissertations